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8 Crazy Treatments For Hair Loss (That Never Worked!)

Posted by Cynthia Ferrara on

Consider yourself lucky: you’re living at a time when hair loss treatments and products are
within easy reach. The best part of all is that they’ve undergone rigorous testing for their safety and efficacy, so that you don’t have to feel like a guinea pig.

Throughout history (and even in modern times), people have tried in vain to find the best hair
loss treatments out there. Think about putting dead animal parts or herbs on your scalp!

crazy-treatments-for-hair-loss

These are some of the most bizarre hair loss treatments that never worked:

Animal Fat

Some 3,500 years ago, the Ebers Papyrus, an ancient Egyptian medical text,
suggested that fat from a snake, tomcat, hippopotamus, crocodile, and ibex could be
made into a concoction topically applied to the scalp for four days would help with hair
loss.

Ginger

In several Asian countries where ginger is abundant and grows in the wild,
people believe that rubbing its chopped root onto bald spots of the head can stimulate
follicle growth.

Concoction Made of Animal Parts

When Julius Caesar was struggling with thinning hair, Cleopatra told him to apply a mixture of ground mice combined with bear grease and horse teeth. Since this didn’t work, he then covered his head using a laurel wreath.

Bull Sperm

In London, bull semen is a modern trend that claims to treat hair loss. This idea was conceptualized out of the fact that calve gravy contains high levels of protein. While protein is proven to support keratin production for hair, there are other more credible sources of this vitamin rather than bull sperm!

Tabasco

Studies showed that the capsaicin content of Tabasco could stimulate hair growth. However, the study was conducted by injecting capsaicin into mice which were then ingested by human subjects. Tabasco is a known burning agent when too much is applied to the skin, or it’s exposed to sensitive skin.

onion-bulb

Onion Juice

In some European countries, it is believed that onion juice promotes healthy hair follicle growth. Doing this is a messy and smelly process since you’ll need to juice an onion with a grater then apply it directly on your head. While onion is scientifically proven to have benefits for the human body, there are no studies proving its efficacy for hair loss.

Yeast Infection Medicine

Monistat, Miconazole Nitrate, and other yeast infection creams were trendy among people desperate for a solution to treat thinning hair and hair loss. These fungal infection creams are thought to work by creating a healthy environment when applied to the scalp but the side effects include shedding once the medicines are stopped.

Beer

Historically, beer was applied to the scalp to treat thinning, limp hair despite the
absence of any studies that it actually worked. Hops and barley may actually give the
illusion of thicker, fuller hair; but there are no studies claiming that it works.

Pretty crazy, right? Thankfully, there are natural serums, shampoos, and conditioners that you can use for hair loss instead.


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